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Get Informed

“Learn as much as you can about your disease, but stick to science-backed sources such as a medical library or university websites. I once had a person with MS tell me that she had had all of her teeth pulled out, not for dental reasons but because she had read on the internet that MS was caused by the metals in dental work.”

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--? Seth Morgan, MD, neurologist who has MS

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pills in hand
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Take Your Medicine

The current crop of MS medications are extremely effective, and they can control this disease. Make sure you understand why it's important to take your medication -- what the benefits are, and what to expect. And take your medication just as your doctor prescribed it to get the most benefit.

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-- Clyde Markowitz, MD, director, Multiple Sclerosis Center at Penn Medicine, Philadelphia.

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mature woman walking
3 / 5

Embrace Your Resilience

MS may try to take control of your life, but you are more resilient than you know. Most urgently, find a health care provider who is right for you. Get on the MS medication that’s best for you. Build your wellness plan: a healthy diet, plenty of exercise, good sleep habits, and making a priority of the things that give you joy.

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--? Cyndi Zagieboylo, president and CEO, National MS Society, New York

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baked fish
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Follow Smart Health Practices

Make healthy lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet, such as the Mediterranean-style diet. Get at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise weekly. Make sleep a priority. Doing these things lowers the risk of diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure. These conditions have a link to later MS disability. They also help people with MS have a better quality of life.

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--? Ellen Mowry, MD, co-director, Multiple Sclerosis Precision Medicine Center of Excellence, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

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man relaxing
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Know Your Body

You are the best expert on your own body. Remember to listen to and respect it. It’s OK to say “No” and to adjust your schedule if you don’t feel well. Taking a brief rest today could keep you from taking several days rest to recover from overdoing it.

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-- Mitzi Joi Williams, MD, neurologist and MS specialist, Atlanta

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Sources | Medically Reviewed on 12/14/2020 Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on December 14, 2020

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

  1. Getty
  2. Getty
  3. Getty
  4. Getty
  5. Getty

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SOURCES:

Clyde Markowitz, MD, director, Multiple Sclerosis Center, Penn Medicine, Philadelphia.

Seth Morgan, MD, neurologist, Chevy Chase, MD.

Cyndi Zagieboylo, president and CEO, National MS Society, New York.

Ellen Mowry, MD, co-director, Multiple Sclerosis Precision Medicine Center of Excellence, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.

Mitzi Joi Williams, MD, neurologist and MS specialist, Atlanta.

Penn Medicine: “Multiple Sclerosis and Exercise: Why MS Patients Should Stay Active.”

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on December 14, 2020

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.